Grant Proposal

Tacoma Computer Clubhouse:

Request for Capital Funding for Computer and Multi-Media Equipment

By: Rutha Nuguse, Shannon Talbot, Nancy Zahn& Adel T.

 

Executive Summary- Adel

ADEL

 


Table of Contents (Shannon-Layout/Nancy-Editing)

Executive Summary- Adel……………………………………………………………………………. 2

Table of Contents (Shannon-Layout/Nancy-Editing)………………………………………… 3

Introduction (Shannon)……………………………………………………………………………….. 1

Organizational History (Shannon)………………………………………………………………. 2

Intel Computer Clubhouse Network…………………………………………………………….. 2

Tacoma Computer Clubhouse…………………………………………………………………….. 2

Tacoma Computer Clubhouse Programs (Rutha)……………………………………………. 4

Community Needs Statement (Nancy and Rutha)……………………………………………… 5

Problem (Nancy)……………………………………………………………………………………… 5

Solution (Rutha)………………………………………………………………………………………… 6

Funding Needs (Adel)…………………………………………………………………………………. 8

Budget (Nancy)…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 9

Conclusion (Adel)……………………………………………………………………………………… 10

Appendix A (Shannon)…………………………………………………………………………….. 11

Image 1………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

Image 2………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

Appendix B: Hardware and Software Specifications (Nancy)………………….. 13

Lenovo IdeaCentre B550 Specifications………………………………………………… 13

15” MacBook Pro Specifications………………………………………………………………. 14

Appendix C: Sources (Rutha)………………………………………………………………….. 17

 

 

 


Introduction (Shannon)

The Tacoma Computer Clubhouse (the Clubhouse) was established in 2001 with a mission statement of providing a safe out-of-school learning environment where young people from underserved communities work with adult mentors to explore their ideas, develop new skills, and build confidence in themselves through the use of technology. The Clubhouse opened with fifteen computers in the main room, one computer in the music studio, tables, chairs, and standardized décor provided by Intel.

 

Over 12 years the Clubhouse has served hundreds of children, many of whom come back to help other children. They have provided projects to showcase the skills that these students learn and practice, and are relevant to the community. They even provide to food for students who come in the afternoon.

 

Currently the Clubhouse is down to seven computers in the main room and one in the music studio. Their design software is outdated and most computers are running only partial programs of Adobe’s Creative Suite 3 or 4.

 

The Clubhouse is looking to purchase eight touchscreen PCs, Two Macs and upgrade all of the computers to Windows 8 and Adobe Creative Cloud, costing $21333. These updates will provide students with the updated equipment and software to make better projects now and acquire updated skills to be applied later on in life.

 

This proposal outlines the background of the organization and the projects the Clubhouse undertakes to make a positive impact on the students in the community. The proposal then outlines the needs statement, how the Clubhouse’s funding will be used to enhance the positive impact for our students, the Clubhouse’s budget, and the closing with appendices.

 

 

Organizational History (Shannon)

This section will cover how Intel started the Computer Clubhouses, how the Tacoma Computer Clubhouse (the Clubhouse) was established, and touch on how The Clubhouse is doing today.

Intel Computer Clubhouse Network

Intel opened the first Computer Clubhouse in 1993 as a part of the (now) Museum of Science in Boston. In 1996, based on the growing community interest, they opened a second Computer Clubhouse in Blue Hill Avenue, Boston. In 1997, Intel Decided to establish the Computer Clubhouse Network, setting up other clubhouses even in other countries. By 2001 there are 49 Computer Clubhouses in 9 countries around the world, including the one they opened that year in Tacoma. Today there are over 200 Computer Clubhouses world wide, serving over 25,000 youth per year with access to resources, skills, and experiences to help them succeed in future careers, contribute to their communities, and lead outstanding lives. The Clubhouse Network’s mission statement:

“The Computer Clubhouse provides a creative and safe out-of-school learning environment where young people from underserved communities work with adult mentors to explore their own ideas, develop skills, and build confidence in themselves through the use of technology” (Intel).

 

Tacoma Computer Clubhouse

The Computer Clubhouse of Tacoma was founded in 2001 in the Hilltop neighborhood. Intel gave them a grant to get started, setting Tacoma up with equipment, chairs, tables, and standardized décor. Each Computer Clubhouse is opened in a community-based organization (CBO). Tacoma Computer Clubhouse’s organization is Allen Renaissance. After launching a clubhouse, Intel’s involvement moves to a “higher level”, providing less support but still assisting with leadership training, conference, travel stipends, etc. Once established, the individual clubhouses become responsible for their own funding. In 2001 Tacoma Computer Clubhouse opened with fifteen computers in the main space and one in a music studio.

 

For over 12 years, the Clubhouse has served hundreds of youth in the city of Tacoma who continue to come back to help others. Most students who are involved with the Clubhouse will comment on how it has impacted their lives, making them better people and giving them the tools to be successful. One student, now a sophomore at Lincoln High School, Dolly, started coming to the clubhouse in the 4th grade.  She said, then she lacked motivation, so she was failing in school. She commented that coming to the Tacoma Clubhouse she “gained motivation, and the skills [she] needed to succeed.” She also stated that coming to the Clubhouse helped her get through the hard times she was going through at home by giving her an escape from them in a safe environment.

 

Today, The Tacoma Community Clubhouse currently serves fifteen to twenty students per school day, and even feeds the kids who come in the afternoon. During the school year, the Clubhouse is a drop in program.  Students come in to create projects individually and collaboratively. Currently, students can create projects in the fields of “making”, video production, music production, mobile app development, game development, and 3D animation.  Students proudly showcase their work in different ways. To see a selection of students work, visit Tacoma Community Clubhouse’s web page (http://www.allenrenaissance.org/clubhouse253.html) and look at their “projects” page (see Images 1 and 2, Appendix A).

 

While working on these projects, the students are encouraged to move from “just playing” to becoming actively engaged in a creative project. They are encouraged to create meaningful projects for themselves and the community. The students are encouraged to keep portfolios of their work that will not only be able to show off their skills later on in life, but also show their progress in their work over time. The students are also shown how these computer-based skills can be applied to pursuits outside of the Clubhouse.

 

 

 

Tacoma Computer Clubhouse Programs (Rutha)

The Tacoma Computer Clubhouse (the Clubhouse) is a dynamic environment.  All across the globe, Clubhouses host a variety of programs including:

Adobe Youth Voices – AYV is Adobe Foundation’s signature philanthropy program, providing youth in select Computer Clubhouses with opportunities to use Adobe multimedia and digital tools to communicate and share ideas with their communities.

Clubhouse-to-College/Clubhouse-to-Career- The C2C program offers Clubhouse Members educational and professional tools, activities and hands-on support to move forward in their lives with confidence, skills, and purpose.

Gender Equity– Hear our Voices, funded in part by the National Science Foundation, helps Computer Clubhouses provide a supportive environment where girls and young women can use technology in ways that are relevant and meaningful to them.

Teen Summit– Every two years, Computer Clubhouse youth leaders from all over the globe are chosen to come to Boston for the Teen Summit.  During the Summit, Members learn about other cultures, explore career opportunities, experience life on a college campus, collaborate on projects, learn new technologies and more

 

 

Community Needs Statement (Nancy and Rutha)

(Intro-Nancy)

Situated in the Hilltop neighborhood of Tacoma, the Tacoma Computer Clubhouse (the Clubhouse) serves a diverse group of students.  Specifically targeting under-served youth, those with limited access to technology, the mission of the Clubhouse is to provide “a creative and safe out-of-school learning environment where young people from underserved communities work with adult mentors to explore their ideas, develop new skills, and build confidence in themselves through the use of technology.

Problem (Nancy)

Ultimately addressing the problem of the so-called digital divide—the notion that based on their race/ethnicity, economic status, and/or gender some populations are left behind technologically and thus academically and socio-economically (Mossberger, Tolbert, & Gilbert, 2006)—the Clubhouse incorporates self-directed learning through technology in an out-of-school setting to reach those under-served youth populations.  For many of Tacoma’s youth, they most certainly fit the under-served category.

For example, 54 percent of students enrolled in Tacoma Public Schools (TPS) were listed as minority students last school year (TPS, 2012).  Some neighborhood schools closest to the Clubhouse posted even higher minority enrollment numbers; Lincoln High School had a combined minority enrollment of over 73 percent in the 2010-2011 school year (TPS, 2012). Georgia Hall, researcher for the National Institute of Out-of-School Time, part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College, examined the impact race has on technology use among teens.  Hall found that the body or research largely points to decreased access to technology, even in the classroom, for minority youth: “Students who attend schools…highly populated by minority youth have less access to most types of technology…Minority students were also less likely to have used a computer for English classes or for solving problems in math courses” (2006).

Similarly, 63.2 percent of TPS’s student population qualified for the Free and Reduced Lunch Program in the 2012-2013 school year.  This was well above the state average of 46.1 percent for the same period (TPS 2012).  The implication here is not hard to see: many of Tacoma’s youth live near or below the poverty level.  Mosseberger, Tolbert, & Gilbert found that in conjunction with race/ethnicity, socio-economic status largely impacts access to technology, as well as future opportunities: “Individuals who spend their adolescence in areas of concentrated poverty are statistically more likely to suffer lifelong disadvantages in employment, even when they move outside these neighborhoods” (2006).  The Clubhouse finds itself in a position to not only feed the minds of the students that come through the door, but also faces the need of feeding their stomachs.

In addition to the problems of race/ethnicity and poverty, gender is another dividing factor when it comes to technological fluency.  Hall concedes that “computers are not inherently gender biased.  It is primarily the attitudinal, social, and environmental factors that” create technological gaps between males and females (2006).  Riegle-Crumb et al come to a similar conclusion when researching the continued disparity in STEM majors despite the advances made in female college enrollment and increases in female scores on secondary STEM testing (2012).  Shapiro and Williams identify one possible cause as the “stereotype threat,” in which just the thought of being viewed negatively is perhaps influencing female involvement in STEM, even when they themselves may feel confident in their own abilities.  Here in TPS’s own Science and Math Institute (SAMI), enrollment was 55 percent male-45 percent female in the 2012-2013 year, despite the fact that district wide the male/female ratio is almost exactly 50/50.  Clearly, there is some work to be done locally to break through the stereotype that girls are not suited for STEM studies and careers.

 

Solution (Rutha)

The Clubhouse is an environment for teens to experience different programs and learn new techniques a in various programs offered.  As  Bers. M researched, programs available for youth have significant impact for their futures in any career they choose. Nonetheless, technology development motivates individuals, and educates them in different aspects to gain skills and also develop new skills. The AVA goal is to help teach students with digital tools with the help from Adobe’s Foundation. “The Positive Technological Development framework (PTD) is a natural extension of the computer literacy and the technological fluency movements that have influenced the world of education. PTD examines the developmental tasks of a child growing up in the digital era and provides a model for developing and evaluating technology-rich youth programs. Software services have a huge impact at the Clubhouse because students get to explore new technology and gain new skills that can help them apply elsewhere.

With the help of the C2C program, members have the opportunity to have hands on experiences and build skills to take on into their daily lives.  Goode says that “Informal learning experiences with family or friends might also influence students’ relationship with technology. In each of these environments, learning more about technology, with the guidance of more knowledgeable users, is important for building a technology identity.” Although experiencing technology elsewhere and with others is a good source of getting into technology, the C2C program is highly motivated to provide students access to technology supply, tools, guidance, and mentors to guide them.

 

Gender Equity is always important in all types of situations especially when it comes to supportive environments that welcomes students to use technology to implement useful outcomes in appreciative surroundings. As Tandra Tyler-Wood said that females have hope and can successfully set their minds to science. “Effective science program curriculum for young female students should address the very specific needs of bright and capable female students.”  The Gender Equality is a program that welcomes students that need support empower their hopes, where females use the technology and gain and build their technology.

Gathering students to motivate them and help them understand the opportunities that are out there for students always has a huge impact in their lives; either motivational or significance learning experiences.  As Tandra Tyler-Wood mentioned how Bringing Girls up In Science (BUGS) students preferably female had greater motivation if there were supporting leaders, and especially environments. “Gains in academic achievement are evident as the BUGS participants in the initial study made significantly greater gains on the ITBS-S pre- to post-test than the contrast group.”

 

Funding Needs (Adel)

 

ADEL

 

Budget (Nancy)

 

New   Equipment Unit Price Qty Extended
Lenovo IdeaCentre B550*

$1200

7

$8400

MacBook Pro**

$2000

2

$4000

       
Existing   Equipment      
Windows   Operating System Upgrades

$200

7

$1400

       
Licenses      
Adobe Creative   Production Premium 6***

$150

4

$600

       
Installation****      
New Equipment

$300

9

$2700

Software   Upgrades and CS Installation

$300

8

$2400

  Subtotal

$19500

  Tacoma Sales Tax

$1833

  Estimated Total

$21333

       
*Specifications in Appendix B      
** Specifications in Appendix B      
***Nonprofit pricing      
**** Estimated installation based on small managed services provider extending nonprofit discount; installation costs may vary.

 


 

Conclusion (Adel)

 

ADEL

 


 

Appendices- Rutha, Nancy, Shannon

Appendix A (Shannon)

 

Image 1

img1

 

 


 

Image 2

 

 

 img2

 

 

 

Appendix B: Hardware and Software Specifications (Nancy)

 

Lenovo IdeaCentre B550 Specifications

 


img3 

 

 

15” MacBook Pro Specifications

 

 
Processor 2.0GHz

2.0GHz quad-core Intel Core i7 processor (Turbo Boost up to 3.2GHz) with 6MB shared L3 cache

Memory 8GB of 1600MHz DDR3L onboard memory
Storage 256GB
Graphics and Video Support Intel Iris Pro Graphics

 

Dual display and video mirroring: Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display and up to 2560 by 1600 pixels on up to two external displays, both at millions of colors

 

Thunderbolt digital video output

  • Native Mini DisplayPort output
  • DVI output using Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter (sold separately)
  • VGA output using Mini DisplayPort to VGA Adapter (sold separately)
  • Dual-link DVI output using Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter (sold separately)

 

HDMI video output

  • Support for 1080p resolution at up to 60Hz
  • Support for 3840-by-2160 resolution at 30Hz
  • Support for 4096-by-2160 resolution at 24Hz

 

Camera 720p FaceTime HD camera
Connections and Expansion
  • MagSafe 2 power port
  • Two Thunderbolt 2 ports
  • Two USB 3 ports (up to 5 Gbps)
  • HDMI port
  • Headphone port
  • SDXC card slot
  • Apple Thunderbolt to FireWire Adapter (sold separately)
  • Apple Thunderbolt to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter (sold separately)
Wireless Wi‑Fi

  • 802.11ac Wi‑Fi wireless networking;3 IEEE
  • 802.11a/b/g/n compatible

 

Audio
  • Stereo speakers
  • Dual microphones
  • Headphone port
  • Support for Apple iPhone headset with remote and microphone
  • Support for audio line out (digital/analog)

 

Keyboard and Trackpad
  • Full-size backlit keyboard with 78 (U.S.) or 79 (ISO) keys, including 12 function keys and 4 arrow keys (inverted “T” arrangement) with ambient light sensor
  • Multi‑Touch trackpad for precise cursor control; supports inertial scrolling, pinch, rotate, swipe, three‑finger swipe, four‑finger swipe, tap, double‑tap, and drag capabilities

 

Battery and Power
  • Up to 8 hours wireless web
  • Up to 8 hours iTunes movie playback
  • Up to 30 days standby time
  • Built-in 95-watt-hour lithium-polymer battery
  • 85W MagSafe 2 Power Adapter with cable management system; MagSafe 2 power port

 

Electrical and Operating Requirements
  • Line voltage: 100V to 240V AC
  • Frequency: 50Hz to 60Hz
  • Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F (10° to 35° C)
  • Storage temperature: –13° to 113° F (–25° to 45° C)
  • Relative humidity: 0% to 90% noncondensing
  • Operating altitude: tested up to 10,000 feet
  • Maximum storage altitude: 15,000 feet
  • Maximum shipping altitude: 35,000 feet
Operating System OS X Mavericks – Includes:

  • AirDrop
  • AirPlay
  • Dictation
  • Gatekeeper
  • Notification Center
  • Facebook Integration
  • Twitter Integration
  • Multiple Display Support
  • Finder Tabs and Tags
  • iCloud
  • iCloud Keychain
  • Dashboard
  • Mission Control
  • Spotlight Search
  • Safari Power Saver
  • App Nap
  • Power Nap
  • Compressed Memory
  • Built-in Sharing

 

Source of Table Text: http://www.apple.com/macbook-pro/specs-retina/

 

 

 

Appendix C: Sources (Rutha)

 

Scott-Dixon, K. (2004). Doing IT: Women working in information technology. Toronto: Sumach Press.

Hall, G. (September 01, 2006). Teens and technology: Preparing for the future. New Directions for Youth Development, 2006, 111.)

Shapiro, J. R., & Williams, A. M. (January 01, 2012). The Role of Stereotype Threats in Undermining Girls’ and Women’s Performance and Interest in STEM Fields. Sex Roles, 66, 3-4.

Pittman, K. J., Yohalem, N., & Tolman, J. (2003). When, where, what, and how youth learn: Blurring school and community boundaries. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Minke, G., & Minke, G. (2009). Building with earth: Design and technology of a sustainable architecture. Basel: Birkhauser-Publishers for Architecture.

yler-Wood, T., Ellison, A., Lim, O., & Periathiruvadi, S. (February 01, 2012). Bringing Up Girls in Science (BUGS): The Effectiveness of an Afterschool Environmental Science Program for Increasing Female Students’ Interest in Science Careers. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 21, 1, 46-55.

Bers, M. U. (January 01, 2010). Beyond computer literacy: supporting youth’s positive development through technology. New Directions for Youth Development, 2010, 128, 13-23.

Weitzman, B. C., Mijanovich, T., Silver, D., & Brazill, C. (January 01, 2008). If You Build It, Will They Come?: Estimating Unmet Demand for After-School Programs in America’s Distressed Cities. Youth & Society, 40, 1, 3-34.

 

Woodland, M. H. (January 01, 2008). Whatcha Doin’ after School? A Review of the Literature on the Influence of After-School Programs on Young Black Males. Urban Education, 43, 5, 537-560.

Apsler, R. (January 01, 2009). After-school programs for adolescents: a review of evaluation research. Adolescence, 44, 173, 1-19.

Goode, J. (January 01, 2010). The digital identity divide: how technology knowledge impacts college students. New Media & Society, 12, 3, 497-513.

 

Jackson, L. A., von, E. A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y., & Fitzgerald, H. E. (January 01, 2006). Does home internet use influence the academic performance of low-income children?. Developmental Psychology, 42, 3, 429-35.

Lauer, P. A., Akiba, M., Wilkerson, S. B., Apthorp, H. S., Snow, D., & Martin-Glenn, M. L. (June 01, 2006). Out-of-School-Time Programs: A Meta-Analysis of Effects for At-Risk Students. Review of Educational Research, 76, 2.) Anderson Eugene, Kim Dongbin. (. n.d.) Anderson, E. L., Kim, D., & American Council on Education. (2006). Increasing the success of minority students in science and technology. Washington, D.C: American Council on Education.
 
Jones, L. S. (November 01, 1997). Opening doors with informal science: Exposure and access for our underserved students. Science Education, 81, 6.)

Zeldin, A. L., & Pajares, F. (January 01, 2000). Against the Odds: Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Women in Mathematical, Scientific, and Technological Careers. American Educational Research Journal, 37, 1, 215-246.

 

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